Archive for March, 2015

March 23rd 2015
The Jazz Session #449: Jasmine Lovell-Smith

Posted under Podcast & Saxophonists

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Soprano saxophonist Jasmine Lovell-Smith’s debut album is Fortune Songs. In this interview, Lovell-Smith talks about the long road from her native New Zealand to Brooklyn to Connecticut to her current home in Mexico; why she stopped playing music, and how she found the inspiration to start again; her early love of Stan Getz and Sonny Rollins; and her upcoming recording projects. Learn more at jasminelovellsmith.com.

BUY THIS ALBUM AND SUPPORT THE JAZZ SESSION AT THE SAME TIME.

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March 16th 2015
The Jazz Session #448: Mike Bono

Posted under Guitarists & Podcast

The Mike Bono Group - From Where You Are - cover

Guitarist Mike Bono’s first album is From Where You Are. In this interview, Bono talks about discovering jazz on the radio as a teenager and how it changed his life; the sweet pizza-parlor gig that helped him learn standards; his time at the Berklee school of music; and his recent appearance at the Sundance Film Festival in a tribute to Nina Simone. Learn more at mikebonomusic.com.

BUY THIS ALBUM AND SUPPORT THE JAZZ SESSION AT THE SAME TIME.

BONUS: I asked my parents and sister to record the intro for this episode. It did not go well.

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March 9th 2015
The Jazz Session #447: Reggie Quinerly

Posted under Drummers & Podcast

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Drummer Reggie Quinerly’s new album is Invictus (Redefinition Music, 2015). In this interview, he talks about how a poem from the 19th century informs his career and writing; why he wanted to make an album that doesn’t sound like a “drummer’s record;” his relationship with one of his mentors, Lester Grant; and the need for musicians to control their own destinies. Learn more at reggiequinerly.com.

BUY THIS ALBUM AND SUPPORT THE JAZZ SESSION AT THE SAME TIME.

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March 2nd 2015
The Jazz Session #446: Akua Dixon

Posted under Cellists & Podcast

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Cellist Akua Dixon has just released a self-titled solo album that features arrangements she’s written for a variety of ensembles and occasions, but never had the chance to record. In this interview, Dixon talks about her career as a performer and arranger, going all the way back to the band at the Apollo; the traditional and innovative ways she arranges for string quartet; the shameful lack of African-American musicians in American orchestras today; and her time playing with many musical giants, including Max Roach. Learn more at akuadixon.com.

BUY THIS ALBUM AND SUPPORT THE JAZZ SESSION AT THE SAME TIME.

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