Archive for the 'Live shows' Category

October 5th 2017
House Concert: Ross Hammond

Posted under Guitarists & Live shows

Last night my fiancee-in-crime and I hosted our first house concert. A couple dozen people piled into our living room to listen to Sacramento’s Ross Hammond play an hour of blues, spirituals and improvised music on the resonator guitar. It was a magical night. I want to share some of it with you, so here are three of the songs Ross played last night. Find his music at http://www.rosshammond.com.

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March 23rd 2012
Review: Nellie McKay Occupies Feinstein’s

Posted under Live shows


Nellie McKay performs at Feinstein’s at Loews Regency in New York City. (Photo from a 2010 performance by Amy T. Zielinski)

Nellie McKay Occupies Feinstein’s:
Tin Pan Alley Environmentalism In The Belly Of The Beast

(NEW YORK CITY – MARCH 23, 2012) Hearing Nellie McKay sing about Rachel Carson at Feinstein’s on March 22 was like watching a Michael Moore movie at a Goldman Sachs board meeting.

The evening didn’t start well. In line was a couple complaining about how they’re always there and they just can’t understand why they don’t have their usual table and blah blah blah blah. (“We’ll seat you at Mr. Feinstein’s personal table, ma’am.” Ugh.) Everyone had fur on and the place looked like the set of a 1940s mob movie, except for the very modern prices. Given the announced program for the evening — a musical revue about an environmentalist — it seemed that something must have gone horribly wrong.

But it took just a few minutes into the first song to see that if a joke was being played, McKay was definitely in on it. Her subversive set of activist-inspired protest pop would have found a friendlier audience in Zucotti Park, but part of the genius of the show was that people in furs paid $40-70 each plus a $25 food-and-beverage minimum to have someone criticize their existence while playing a ukelele.

Rachel Carson was a pioneering environmentalist whose book Silent Spring galvanized the nation in support of protecting natural resources. McKay’s revue (“Silent Spring — It’s Not Nice To Fool Mother Nature”) was part biopic, part polemic, part iVictrola playlist of music from the Tin Pan Alley era.

McKay never stopped smiling for the entire show, except during the few occasions when it was appropriate for the narrative. But the smile seemed to be directed as much at her band or at Carson’s hovering ghost as at the audience members eating $15 plates of lettuce. This was cabaret for the endtimes, which is appropriate given that global warming means the piano at Feinstein’s will likely be underwater during McKay’s lifetime once the Atlantic Ocean reclaims the isle of Manhattan.

The evening’s song selections included a host of standards, from Irving Berlin’s “What’ll I Do” and Cole Porter’s “Let’s Do It” to “Ten Cents A Dance” by Rogers & Hart and “Lazy Bones” by Hoagy Carmichael and Johnny Mercer. But in between these more Feinstein’s-appropriate numbers were surprising choices – Neil Young’s “Ohio” and Charles Mingus’s “Fables of Faubus,” for example, both probably being performed for the first time on that particular stage.

McKay also included several of her own compositions. They were among the strongest performances of the night, even given the illustrious songwriting company mentioned above. Her puckish humor and coquettish delivery were perfect for the deadpan (is it deadpan if you’re always smiling?) punch to the stomach she delivered with the story.

The story followed Carson’s life from childhood to her death in 1964 at age 56. Along the way, McKay used props, recorded dialogue and live acting to tell the story of Carson’s evolution from a nature-loving child to a Washington bureaucrat to a popular author and crusading environmentalist. The biographical elements of the story weren’t overly detailed, often hinting at the elements of Carson’s life rather than providing specific descriptions. At times, the songs served to fill in the gaps, although often they were as much to create a mood or illustrate the time period as they were programmatic devices.

McKay ended the revue with a James-Brown-inspired performance of “Let’s Do It,” complete with the Godfather of Soul’s patented drop to the stage and cape-assisted exit. The cape, by the way, had the initials “RC” on the back.

McKay then ran back on stage and performed a joyous version of her reggae tune “Caribbean Time.” Incredibly, she got the Feinstein’s crowd to join her in a call-and-response section. Never have so many men in bow ties sung “oh-ee-oh.”

The revue is an excellent idea, well executed. It deserves to be heard by a wider — and more ecologically minded — audience. But kudos to McKay for having the guts to perform this music in the belly of the beast.

/ / /

VIDEO: Here’s McKay performing “Caribbean Time” in 2010:

NOTE: Photo of Nellie McKay as Rachel Carson by Rick Gonzalez.

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September 27th 2011
PHOTOS & RECAP: Camila Meza at Small’s Jazz Club

Posted under Live shows & Podcast

From Camila Meza at Small's Jazz Club

I spent most of the day on the train yesterday, traveling back and forth between NYC and New Haven, CT. By the time I got back home to Brooklyn I was tired and planning to crash for the night. But I decided to see who was playing around town, just in case. I noticed that Chilean vocalist and guitarist Camila Meza was at Small’s Jazz Club. I’d never heard her music so I visited her site, listened to about two minutes of her singing, and hopped back on a train to Manhattan.

From Camila Meza at Small's Jazz Club

Meza has a rich voice that’s playful without being too syrupy. Her repertoire was straight from the Great American Songbook (with the exception of Ibrahim Ferrer’s “Silencio”), but she managed to make the music sound fresh with her obvious enthusiasm and her emotional connection with the songs.

From Camila Meza at Small's Jazz Club

Meza was joined by bassist Pablo Menares, another new-to-me player. Menares was equally skilled at holding down the bottom and making interesting harmonic choices throughout the range of his instrument. And his soloing was melodic and creative.

From Camila Meza at Small's Jazz Club

Meza’s guitar playing was equally impressive — and would have been completely at home in the 1950s. Her solos were fluid and well constructed without falling back on cliches. Several times she doubled her solos with her voice.

From Camila Meza at Small's Jazz Club

For the final song of the night (“But Not For Me”), Meza and Menares were joined by saxophonist Melissa Aldana, who fit perfectly with the old school vibe that was happening on stage. Aldana leads a regular jam session at Cafe Vivaldi and played with Greg Osby in August.

From Camila Meza at Small's Jazz Club

My only request for Meza’s next gig would be more songs in Spanish and from farther afield than the Great American Songbook. She’s playing in Berne, Switzerland for five nights in October, and then at several New York locations later this fall. Go see her.

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September 19th 2011
Photos & Recap: Carmen Staaf Trio at 55 Bar – 18 Sept 2011

Posted under Live shows

From Carmen Staaf at 55 Bar – 9/18/11

I’ve written about Carmen Staff before and told you how impressed I am with her as a pianist. I’ve also interviewed her for The Jazz Session. And last night I had the chance to see her perform in a trio setting at one of my favorite New York music spots, The 55 Bar.

From Carmen Staaf at 55 Bar – 9/18/11

The 55 Bar doesn’t have a piano, so Staaf played a Fender Rhodes, which made for a very different listening experience to the acoustic performance I’d heard previously. The Rhodes is a tricky beast, and the skills necessary to playing the piano don’t necessarily make a successful Rhodes player. Staaf did just fine, though, using the Rhodes to its full capacity and showing the same fluid touch that struck me before.

From Carmen Staaf at 55 Bar – 9/18/11

Staaf was joined by bassist Jorge Roeder and drummer Ronnie Burrage. This was the trio’s first time playing together, and they weren’t ashamed to work some things out on stage, particularly Burrage’s tunes. Burrage spent some time as McCoy’s Tyner’s drummer years ago, and he introduced one of his tunes as one which McCoy has “played the crap out of.” (Eliciting the comment, “No pressure, Carmen,” from one of Staaf’s friends in the audience.) Whether it was the McCoy comparison or just the adrenalin that comes from fighting your way through a brand new tune, Staaf rose to the challenge and delivered a smart and muscular solo that used the full range of the Rhodes.

From Carmen Staaf at 55 Bar – 9/18/11

Another highlight for me was Staaf’s breathtaking “Nymphs of the Milky Way,” which I wrote about when I saw her at Issue Project Room. The piece is gorgeous, and was made more so by Roeder’s sensitive bass work. I’ve seen him in a number of contexts here in New York, and he always knows just how to serve the music.

Here are a few other things I tweeted during the show:

From Carmen Staaf at 55 Bar – 9/18/11

@carmenstaaf trio playing a 3/4 or 6/8 or 150/200 version of “All The Things You Are.” Ronnie Burrage on cajon. (Also note the album cover on the wall with “Carmen” on it. A different Carmen, of course, but still a fun coincidence.)

From Carmen Staaf at 55 Bar – 9/18/11

Very nice 70s vibe by @carmenstaaf trio on “Solar” into Staaf’s “Dream of Four Paths.”

From Carmen Staaf at 55 Bar – 9/18/11

Henry Grimes just showed up at @carmenstaaf’s show. Very, very cool. #jazzlives #sodoeshenry

From Carmen Staaf at 55 Bar – 9/18/11

Nice deconstruction of “In Walked Bud” by @carmenstaaf.

Last night gave me the chance to see a new side of Carmen Staaf and once again I was very happy to be there. Staaf is playing at the 55 Bar at the end of September (watch her site for the exact date). You can also follow her on Twitter at @carmenstaaf. And if you’d like to get my updates and photos as they happen, you can follow me on Twitter at @jasondcrane.

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September 15th 2011
PHOTOS & RECAP: Dalton Ridenhour at Small’s (9/15/11)

Posted under Live shows

From Dalton Ridenhour & Friends at Small's – 9/15/11

I met pianist Dalton Ridenhour through a mutual friend a couple weeks ago. As soon as he told me he played stride piano, I asked him to make sure to let me know when he was playing. I happened to be in town for tonight’s gig and had a chance to see Dalton — and some friends — take the crowd at Small’s on a tour through jazz piano history.

From Dalton Ridenhour & Friends at Small's – 9/15/11

Ridenhour has a great ear for melodies. He mostly played immediately recognizable tunes — “Maple Leaf Rag,” “Do You Know What It Means To Miss New Orleans?” or “Alberta, Alberta” — but he sprinkled in some pieces that were new to me such as “Cryin’ For The Carolines” and a James P. Johnson tune that I think was called “Riffs.” Throughout the set, Ridenhour showed not only a mastery of the piano, but a real sense for pacing and flow and for the general shape of a song. His improvisations were fluid and interesting, which was particularly impressive given the harmonic and rhythmic rules imposed by the genre.

From Dalton Ridenhour & Friends at Small's – 9/15/11

Twice during the set, Ridenhour featured vocalist Mara Kaye, who belted out “Sugar In My Bowl” and “Any Kind of Man” and slunk her way through “Baby Won’t You Please Come Home.” She had a strong and very anachronistic voice that perfectly fit the music. (Although it was sometimes a little more than the sound system could handle.) She’s definitely someone I’ll watch for around her native Brooklyn.

From Dalton Ridenhour & Friends at Small's – 9/15/11

Trombonist Dan Reitz was a nice addition to two of the last three tunes.

From Dalton Ridenhour & Friends at Small's – 9/15/11

Ridenhour is a talented player. I’ll be seeing him again. If you’d like to be transported back in time to hear piano music from a bygone — but still very fresh and alive — age, you should see him, too.

From Dalton Ridenhour & Friends at Small's – 9/15/11

From Dalton Ridenhour & Friends at Small's – 9/15/11

From Dalton Ridenhour & Friends at Small's – 9/15/11

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September 7th 2011
PHOTOS & RECAP: Matt Mitchell & Ches Smith at Korzo – 6 Sept 2011

Posted under Live shows & Podcast

Tonight, after 12 hours of travel from Detroit to New York City, I decided to head back out in the rain to Korzo to see a solo set by pianist Matt Mitchell and a duo set by Matt and drummer Ches Smith. It proved to be a very good choice on my part, as it was an evening of music unlike I’ve heard before and played at the highest level.

From Matt Mitchell & Ches Smith at Korzo – 6 Sept 2011

Matt Mitchell said he’d never played tonight’s compositions in public. In fact, he said he’d never intended to play the music in the second set until Ches offered to learn it. At one point Matt turned to the audience and said, “I’d like to publicly thank Ches Smith for learning this fucking music.” We’re all lucky that happened.

From Matt Mitchell & Ches Smith at Korzo – 6 Sept 2011

The opening solo set was very, very intense. I don’t know if it was compounded by fatigue or a lack of food, but at one point I wrote a note to the friend who was with me that read, “This is making me sad/agitated.” That’s not a criticism. In fact, it’s a compliment. Music that causes an emotional reaction is my favorite kind of music. My friend responded by saying that it made her feel like breaking all the glasses in the restaurant. Sadly, she didn’t act on that feeling.

Another friend who was there described the pieces as “etudes,” which is apt. The compositions were a series of small, gem-like studies surrounded by layer upon layer of jagged, imaginative improvisation. Having never heard any of them before, I had no idea which bits were written and which improvised, and my guess is that Mitchell intended for that to be the case.

From Matt Mitchell & Ches Smith at Korzo – 6 Sept 2011

The addition of drummer Ches Smith took the agitated onslaught of the first set and hardened it into a precise chaos of pointed rhythms and surprising melodic invention. I think that sentence is probably crap, but I’m having some trouble telling you what I heard. I’ll just leave off by saying what I said on Twitter: “That was a hell of a show. If you missed Matt Mitchell and Ches Smith tonight, you really did miss something.”

From Matt Mitchell & Ches Smith at Korzo – 6 Sept 2011

p.s. — I also wrote a poem at the show.

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September 5th 2011
PHOTOS & RECAP: 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 4

Posted under Detroit Jazz Fest & Live shows & Podcast

I think I’ve talked about the weather in all four of these reports from the Detroit Jazz Festival. That’s because the weather has been crazy. Mid-90s on the first two days. Then big thunderstorms and lots of rain. And today it was cold enough that I was blowing on my hands to keep them warm and actually having trouble tweeting because my thumbs were cold. Oh, the humanity!

I saw a lot of good music today. I’m heading back to New York in the morning, where I do this kind of thing quite often from NYC clubs. (And I also interview people, which is the main point of this site. Look to the left for the list of past guests.) You can follow me on Twitter at @jasondcrane.

PRE-SHOW THOUGHTS
Looking forward to seeing @anthony__wilson live today for what I think is the first time. Hard to believe, but I think it’s true.
Wine lovers: Pls recommend good wines to hurl at @anthony__wilson while he performs. That’s jazz etiquette, right? Or maybe Blues Bros?
When I arrived at #DJ2011 on Friday it was 94 degrees. Right now, on the final day, it’s 60 degrees. Luckily I brought my snowsuit.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Festival Day 4

Eating falafel while Gary Burton’s New Quartet plays “Afro Blue” on the stage below me.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Festival Day 4

Burton band now playing bassist Scott Colley’s “Never The Same Way.”

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Festival Day 4

Both Gary Burton and bandmate Julian Lage have been on The Jazz Session. (Listen: Burton (2009), Lage (2009) and Lage (2011).)

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Festival Day 4

Gary Burton and Julian Lage snaking their way through “I Hear A Rhapsody.”
Ah, trading fours. How I’ve (not particularly) missed you.
Now some flashes of the countrified groove Gary Burton used to play back in the 70s.
In my opinion, it’s nearly impossible to not channel Pat Metheny while playing this music.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Festival Day 4

Wow. Didn’t know this @anthony__wilson set was going to be an organ trio. Love it.
The trio is @anthony__Wilson, Larry Goldings and Karriem Riggins. What more do you need? And the sun just came out.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Festival Day 4

This @anthony__wilson trio is down, dirty and fun as hell.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Festival Day 4

Guy behind me just yelled, “Damn, baby, you’re in the pocket!” at @anthony__wilson.
Loving this mystical transition between songs.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Festival Day 4

If a fiery beast burst forth from the stage right now, this music would be the perfect accompaniment.
Following that hellfire and brimstone tune, @anthony__wilson starts into “Body And Soul.” Which is actually a pretty good joke.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Festival Day 4

@anthony__wilson now playing the title track from his gorgeous CD Campo Belo.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Festival Day 4

Checking out @ChampianFulton and some slow-as-it-wants-to-be speakesy swing.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Festival Day 4

Can’t hear this performance of “Tenderly” by @ChampianFulton without thinking of Nat Cole. Right, @carmenstaaf?
Also Nat-Cole-esque is @ChampianFulton’s position at the piano and ability to sing, play and smile at the crowd all at once.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Festival Day 4

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Festival Day 4

@ChampianFulton now cruising through an up-tempo take on “Samba de Orfeu,” dedicated to family friend Clark Terry.
Just learned that @ChampianFulton’s drummer is Pete Zimmer, who’s been on The Jazz Session. http://bit.ly/ofH9sT.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Festival Day 4

At Camptius Martius with @Mark_Stryker to see Karriem Riggins and Common.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Festival Day 4

Karriem Riggins’ band would be perfect for Gil Scott-Heron. I’m excited to hear Common with them.
Two hours ago, Karriem Riggins was playing “Body And Soul.” A man of many parts.
Trumpeter Nicholas Payton chimed in to say: Man, @KarriemRiggins is like Aquaman. He belongs to both land and sea thus belonging to neither.
Karriem Riggins is wearing a bow tie. ‘Cause they’re cool.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Festival Day 4

Roger Jones repping Flint on Fender Rhodes with @karriemriggins at #DJF2011. cc @MMFlint

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Festival Day 4

“You see white people with soul in Detroit, too. That’s how much soul y’all got.” Common at #DJF2011

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Festival Day 4

@Common with @KarriemRiggins. #DJF2011

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Festival Day 4

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Festival Day 4

Digging @Common at Detroit’s Winter Jazz Fest.

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September 4th 2011
PHOTOS & RECAP: 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

Posted under Detroit Jazz Fest & Live shows & Podcast

There was a bit more rain today for the third day of the Detroit Jazz Festival, but by and large the day went off without a hitch and the streets were once again packed with happy music lovers. The standout set for me today was Anat Cohen’s quartet, followed closely by Vinicius Cantauria’s band on the same stage. Remember, to get my tweets in real time, please follow me on Twitter at @jasondcrane and follow the hashtag #DJF2011.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

Spotted this and thought it was nice of someone to leave it there in case the baby comes back.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

Joe Locke now playing with the Airmen of Note
Another jazz media guy just told me that this Airmen of Note set with Joe Locke will be released as part of a 3-CD set next year.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

Leader of the Airmen of Note is Sgt. Joe Jackson. #steppinout
The Airmen of Locke playing an arrangement of “El Gaucho” that Joe wrote for Gary Burton and the Scottish Natl Jazz Orch.

ANOTHER BIG CROWD

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

New-to-me Detroit pianist Keith Vreeland’s band is cooking in a late-60s fashion. Nice flute/soprano sax front line.
“Really enjoying the drive of Vreeland’s drummer.” (Jazz writer Mark Stryker later told me the drummer was Renell Gonsalves.)
The “Absopure Pyramid Stage” sounds like something from Logan’s Run.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

“…then a funk thing, and we’ll play it until we’re done.” Keith Vreeland’s announcement before the final two tunes.
Lots of odd-metered funk at #DJF2011. #hollandstyle last night, #vreelandstyle right now.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

Now it’s Amina Figarova’s sextet. Flute/trumpet/tenor plus rhythm section. Music from her album Sketches.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

Amina Figarova now playing her post-Katrina tune “Back In New Orleans.”

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

Heading over to see Anat Cohen.
Jason Lindner has the most interesting tiny back-of-head blue mohawk.
Anat’s band is Jason Lindner, Joe Martin and Daniel Friedman.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

I enjoy watching @Anat_Cohen wait for the perfect moment to play almost as much as I enjoy watching her play.
I find @Anat_Cohen incredibly compelling. She’s such a force, musically and in terms of her personality.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

Jason Lindner is such a fiercely exploratory player. Driving, questioning, unrelenting. Love him.
Via pianist Geoffrey Keezer (@88Keezer): “Jason Lindner is badass. 1 of my fave keyboard players.” To which I replied: Cosign. First heard him w/ Claudia Acuna 10 yrs ago. He keeps growing.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

We’re immediately back in the 60s as @Anat_Cohen switches to soprano for (I think) a classic Brazillian tune.
1.5 tunes in and this is easily my favorite set of the day.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

Jason Lindner, people. Get religion.
Holy Christ. Lindner just destroyed this place. I may need to go lie down.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

Lindner and Friedman look like they’re reading one another’s thoughts. They sound that way, too.
Anat just gave a shoutout to Paquito D’Rivera, also playing tonight. Said he’s one of the people who inspired her to play clarinet.
Thinking Lindner and Friedman may be part of an alien race who communicate using only their eyes. Amazingly in sync.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

Swing music as heard while traveling in the TARDIS.
Anat Cohen closing the set with Daniel Friedman’s anthem “All Brothers.”

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

Totally buzzing after @Anat_Cohen’s set. Brilliant. Just brilliant.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

Vinicius Cantuaria now taking the stage.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

Finally, someone playing a laptop and sampler at #DJF2011. With Vinicius Cantuaria.
Guy is quadrupling on laptop, sampler, piano and trumpet.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

Thus far, this set by Vinicius Cantuaria is all about space and how much of it can exist without the song falling apart.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

Feels like the crowd is holding its breath.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

I wish I could tweet you the afternoon sunlight and the cool air and the swaying crowd.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

Off to get my dance on with Sammy Figueroa.
There’s a dance floor up front at Sammy Figueroa’s show and several people are dancing.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

The montuno reigns in Campus Martius park.
Dance floor is packed at Sammy Figueroa’s show. Sabroso!
Sammy just yelled “Sabroso!” Yes, I’m psychic.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

Sammy Figueroa wears his sunglasses at night. So he can…so he can…

STREET INTERLUDE

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

Just heard an elderly guitar player on a street corner recite the opening poem from Days Of Future Passed.
Feeling a lot of civic pride … and this is my first time in Detroit. Well done, #DJF2011.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

The Jeff “Tain” Watts Quartet with Slash, Snooki and Barry Manilow is gonna be killin’ tonight!
Now at the amphitheater for Tain’s band. Apparently he had to get subs for Snooki, Slash and Manilow.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

Marcus Strickland sounds like a summer storm.
I’d watch Jeff Watts play in a silent film. Love looking at him.
There’s a woman up front at Tain’s show who is chair-dancing her ass off. And just as typed that, they put her on the jumbotron.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

Heading over to see @vijayiyer in a few minutes. I think that may do it for me tonight.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

There is a brain-melting buzzing noise coming from the PA at Vijay Iyer’s set. Hope someone figures that out quickly.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

God I adore Stephan Crump.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

Both @vijayiyer http://bit.ly/e47hl and Stephan Crump http://bit.ly/cJ2yaW have been on The Jazz Session
Very intense lighting for Vijay’s show. Feel like someone is going to ask where I was on the night of…

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 3

@vijayiyer trio now playing Threadgill’s “Little Pocket-Sized Demons.”

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September 4th 2011
PHOTOS & RECAP: 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 2

Posted under Detroit Jazz Fest & Live shows & Podcast

It was crazy hot in Detroit today, but the streets and seats were still packed with happy festival fans who listened attentively when that was called for and danced in the aisles sometimes, too. A series of thunderstorms led to the evening acts being either cancelled or moved into the Marriott hotel. That didn’t dampen anyone’s spirits, though, as the music continued into the night while the lightning flashed outside. Here are my photos and tweets from Day 2. To get these in real time, follow me on Twitter at @jasondcrane and also follow the hashtag #DJF2011.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 2

“Checking out vibraphonist Warren Wolf’s surging WOLFPAC. I could easily take this guy in a fight.”
“By the way, WOLFPAC is not, so far as I know, the name of Warren Wolf’s political action committee.”
“Getting a very ‘Keith Jarrett & Gary Burton’ feeling from this piano-vibes duo with Warren Wolf.”

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 2

“Just noticed Joe Locke in the wings watching Warren Wolf. #vibescommunity”
“Now a quartet ballad by Warren Wolf. By the way, the pianist is Lawrence Fields. Sorry if I misspelled his name.”
“Loving Warren Wolf’s ballad playing. Flowing like the Detroit River, which is just a few feet away.”

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 2

“Now listening the gorgeous symbiosis of vocalist Luciana Souza and guitarist Romero Lubambo playing ‘Dindi.'”
If I’m about to die by spontaneously combusting in the heat, I’m glad Luciana and Romero will be the last thing I hear.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 2

“Souza and Romero are just overflowing with joy and mutual respect. God they’re good.”
“Romero Lubambo just said he loves Luciana Souza’s singing so much that she made him cry during their pre-gig rehearsal.”

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 2

“I’d like to go through life with Souza and Rubambo walking next to me, playing”

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 2

“So much spontaneous cheering from this slowly roasting crowd. They’re in love with Luciana and Romero.”

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 2

“Curtis Fuller Sextet starting soon”

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 2

“Curtis Fuller born in 1934 at Herman Keefer (sp?) in Detroit. Now receiving the Detroit Guardian award.”
“Good players in Curtis Fuller’s band. I’m just not a fan of the ‘everybody solos’ format in most cases. I know, I know.”

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 2

“Mike Ledonne, Nat Reeves, Carl Allen are Curtis Fuller’s rhythm section. Next tune: ‘Up Jumped Spring'”
“Curtis Fuller joined in the front line by Josh Bruno on trumpet/flugel and saxophonist Eric Alexander.”

SEGWAY SEGUE

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 2

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 2

“Soul Rebels crushing Stevie Wonder’s ‘Livin’ For The City.’ Now we’re talking.”
“I know I say this all the time, but somebody remind me why I don’t live in New Orleans.”

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 2

“Soul Rebels now crushing MJ’s ‘Rock With You.’ Damn.”
“Sousaphone.”

HOT CROWD

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 2

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 2

“Now Sean Jones, Orrin Evans, Obed Calvaire, Luques Curtis, Brian Hogans.”

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 2

“Haven’t seen Sean Jones in years and years. He sounds great and the band is really tight.”
“Tonight on this same stage: the Sun Ra Arkestra then Dave Holland. There’s a small (read: 100%) chance that I’ll be here.”

COUPLA GUYS

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 2

THE STORM
“Break time is over. Heading back to #DJF2011 for Sun Ra, Jason Moran and Dave Holland. It’s a tough job.”
“Wind is really picking up and I see there’s a severe thunderstorm warning for Detroit. 70% chance of rain. Hmmm…”
“And there’s the lightning and thunder. I do believe there’s another episode of Doctor Who in my immediate future.”
“From my hotel window I can see whitecaps on the Detroit River. And also, sadly, Ceasar’s casino in Windsor, ON.”
“Here’s that rainy, er, night. And I can no longer see most of Windsor from the window.”
“Wow. This is one hell of storm. I can see about 100 yards out my window. Just to the edge of the Detroit River.”
“According to the radar, looks like there’s quite a bit of rain still coming at us.”

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 2

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 2

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 2

“No electricty on main stage, but the Arkestra is still playing.”

THAT’S ALL, FOLKS … OR IS IT?
“It’s official: Detroit Jazz Fest cancelled for rest of night.”
“Walked back to the hotel with Jason Moran and his kids. He asked me to tweet his disappointment at not getting to play for us.”
“ALERT! 1.Jason Moran 9:30pm 2.Dave Holland Octet 10:30pm 3.Deacon Jones Blues Revue 11:30pm. Volt Lounge, Marriott, 3rd fl.”
“No Jason Moran tonight. Dave Holland in 15 minutes. Moran ‘not feeling it,’ according to WEMU’s Linda Yohn.”

VIDEO FROM THE VOLT LOUNGE

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 2

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 2

“My friends and I said we ain’t leaving Detroit until we play some music for you guys.” – Dave Holland. Hero.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 2

“Lightning flashing outside, but the real storm is inside.”
“Gary Smulyan ripping the air with his bari sax. Now Steve Nelson rides the lightning.”
“Thank you, thunderstorm. People need life – and music – to take a left turn from time to time.”

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 2

“The crowd is going apeshit for Dave Holland. Technically speaking.”

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 2

“Dave Holland is not fakin’ the funk. It may be in an odd meter, but it’s real.”
“Antonio Hart is making it happen with Dave Holland right now.”
“If James Brown had been born with one leg shorter than the other, this is the funk he would have made. #hollandstyle”
“Antonio Hart has this crowd in the palm of his hand.”

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 2

“Mass orgasm now happening in the Volt Lounge. Hide the children. #DJF2011 #toofar?”
“Nate Smith is the truth.”
“The Dave Holland Brass Band, Street Choir And Funk Machine.”

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 2

“Now a softer piece. Chris Potter’s ‘Sea of Marmara.'”
“Chris Potter exploring on soprano sax over the rhythm section.”
“There are people on the walkway outside the Volt Lounge windows, watching the show. It appears to be raining on them.”

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 2

“This band has such a L A R G E sound. Very rich and deep.”
“Robin Eubanks soloing on ‘Ebb & Flow.’ I believe this piece is in 179/4. But I may have counted the beat wrong.”
“Chris Potter crushing a solo in about 19 different time signatures.”

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 2

“These guys are terrible. Jazz sucks. Just ask the crowd of screaming people in this hotel bar.”
“Perhaps on Dave Holland’s planet, this is a common time signature. Or else he has eleven fingers?”

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 2

“Ladies and gentlemen, the next mayor of the great city of Detroit … Dave Holland.”
“Lots of music still to come at Volt, but I’m going to end my night on the high of that Dave Holland show.”

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September 2nd 2011
PHOTOS & RECAP: 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 1

Posted under Detroit Jazz Fest & Live shows & Podcast

After years of being invited and not being able to make it, I’m finally here at what radio guru Bobby Jackson calls “Jazz Disneyland.” I slept just 90 minutes the night (morning, really) before coming, because I was out till very late at the Tiny Resistors gig at 55 Bar. I tell you that to excuse my early departure from the festivities tonight. But I managed to see (and tweet about) quite a lot of music. If you’d like to receive my updates as they happen, please follow me on Twitter at @jasondcrane and also the hashtag #detroitjazz. You should also follow Josh Jackson at @checkoutjazz and Mark Stryker at @Mark_Stryker.

Without further ado, here are some photos and tweets from the opening night of the 2011 Detroit Jazz Festival.

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 1

“Tain Watts and his drum club are rollicking and thundering here in Campus Martius park”
“Asked a security guard for directions to Campus Martius Park. He knew the part of Roman history that led to its name. Cool.”

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 1

“Tain playing some Tainpani. Sorry.”
“Two sets of vibes. Tympani. Congas. Drum set. Yes please. #detroitjazz #tainpocalypse”

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 1

“There are A LOT of people here. And they’re happy. Jazz don’t suck.”

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 1

“Nice to see Joe Locke still has a painting of an elderly version of himself in his attic. #detroitjazz #dorianlocke”

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 1

“This is like a dance rhythm for people with three legs of varying lengths.”
“Came all the way to #detroitjazz to hear Tain Watts play a song about a rainy day in Brooklyn.”

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 1

“Drummer Tony Allen now joining the #tainpocalypse”
“I’m a sucker for the funk. Always have been, always will be.”
“‘The drums will bring your rain man home.’ – cameraman to me, moments ago.”

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 1

“Amazing how this many percussionists can remain so unclouded. FOUR drum sets, congas, vibes. Crystal clear rhythmic intention.”

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 1

“Guy in food line to panhandler who asked for sandwich: ‘I’ll give you $2, but you gotta spread your hustle.’ #usa”
“Just ate a bucket of grease disguised as french fries. The #vegan street food is a little sparse. Although there was free hummus earlier.”

VIDEO:

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 1

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 1

“Marvin Gaye’s Trouble Man soundtrack sounds so sweet on this summer night in Detroit.”
“Thousands of people on the streets at #detroitjazz. Still fewer jazz hats than Brooklyn.”

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 1

“Starting now at #detroitjazz: Sing The Truth! with Dianne Reeves, Angelique Kidjo and Lizz Wright.”

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 1

“Lizz Wright IS charisma.”
“If anything, I think the crowd has grown for the late set at #detroitjazz. Tons of people in the streets.”

From 2011 Detroit Jazz Fest Day 1

“Packing it in. Must sleep. 90 minutes last night. Need more tonight. Good night, #detroitjazz.”

2 Comments »

August 22nd 2011
PHOTOS & RECAP: Nico Soffiato at Goodbye Blue Monday

Posted under Live shows

I headed to Goodbye Blue Monday in Bushwyck, Brooklyn, to see guitarist Nico Soffiato as part of his monthly residency there. He plays on the third Saturday of every month, usually with his trio plus a special guest. This month’s guest was saxophonist Noah Kaplan. Nico has been my guest on The Jazz Session.

Here are my photos and tweets from the show. If you’d like to get these photos and tweets as they’re happening, follow me on Twitter.

From Nico Soffiato at Goodbye Blue Monday – August 2011

“Nico Soffiato’s band exploring the jagged edge at Goodbye Blue Monday”

From Nico Soffiato at Goodbye Blue Monday – August 2011

Nico Soffiato plays as vocalist Rosalie Kaplan looks on. She and saxophonist Noah Kaplan are in the band dollshot together.

From Nico Soffiato at Goodbye Blue Monday – August 2011

“Really enjoyed Nico Soffiato’s set at Goodbye Blue Monday. He’s got a great ear for experimenting with guitar sounds”

From Nico Soffiato at Goodbye Blue Monday – August 2011

“Skronk jazz from Noah Kaplan and Nico Soffiato”

From Nico Soffiato at Goodbye Blue Monday – August 2011

“I’m impressed with how often Nico Soffiato lays out, even at his own gig. Serve the music first.”

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August 22nd 2011
PHOTOS and RECAP: The Hands Down and Baudolino’s Dilemna at The Local 269

Posted under Live shows

I went to The Local 269 on Houston Street recently to see an evening of adventurous music. I was there for two of the four bands — The Hands Down (with Jessica Lurie, Ben Syversen, Brian Drye, Michael Bates and Sean Dixon) and Baudolino’s Dilemna (with Ken Filiano, Stephen Haynes, Warren Smith and Michael TA Thompson). Both bands were excellent, and Stephen Haynes in particular blew me away. I’ve interviewed three of the performers from the two bands: Brian Drye, Ken Filiano and Stephen Haynes. Ben Syversen will be my guest on August 29.

The Hands Down

From The Hands Down and Baudolino's Dilemna at The Local 269

From The Hands Down and Baudolino's Dilemna at The Local 269

From The Hands Down and Baudolino's Dilemna at The Local 269

From The Hands Down and Baudolino's Dilemna at The Local 269

Baudolino’s Dilemna

From The Hands Down and Baudolino's Dilemna at The Local 269

From The Hands Down and Baudolino's Dilemna at The Local 269

From The Hands Down and Baudolino's Dilemna at The Local 269

From The Hands Down and Baudolino's Dilemna at The Local 269

From The Hands Down and Baudolino's Dilemna at The Local 269

And here’s what it looked like outside when I left.

1 Comment »

August 22nd 2011
PHOTOS & RECAP: Amy Cervini’s Jazz Country at 55 Bar

Posted under Live shows

I always enjoy hearing Amy Cervini sing. First of all, she’s got a fantastic voice and she knows how to use it. She’s also totally unashamed to sing the music she loves. And she hires great musicians. All those things were in sharp focus recently during her show at the 55 Bar in NYC, where her Jazz Country project played. The band this time featured Matt Aronoff on bass and Jesse Lewis on guitar. I wrote a poem inspired by the show and also took photos and sent out tweets. If you want to get these tweets and photos while the shows are happening, follow me on Twitter. Enjoy!

From Amy Cervini at 55 Bar – August 2011

” inventive, charming, joyous”

From Amy Cervini at 55 Bar – August 2011

From Amy Cervini at 55 Bar – August 2011

“Jesse Lewis is channeling David Gilmour on a gorgeous version of ‘Calling You’ from Baghdad Cafe”

From Amy Cervini at 55 Bar – August 2011

“King Cole Trio vibe now with a swinging version of ‘Frim Fram Sauce'”

No Comments »

August 14th 2011
PHOTOS & RECAP: Carmen Staaf and Kendall Eddy at ibeam

Posted under Live shows

From Carmen Staaf and Kendall Eddy at ibeam (Aug 13, 2011)

On Saturday (August 13, 2011) I headed to ibeam here in Brooklyn for a duo performance by two musicians I’d never seen live — pianist Carmen Staaf and bassist Kendall Eddy. I’d heard a bit of Staaf’s work online (and knew her a bit via social media), but I didn’t really know what to expect.

In a phrase: I was extremely impressed.

Staaf is an incredibly melodic player whose technique is so solid that she can effortlessly execute whatever comes to mind, a talent she displayed on uptempo bop tunes and her own contemplative compositions. Eddy was a great foil for Staaf. He’s a sensitive player with great fluidity over the entire range of the bass. A solid arco player, too.

The whole program was strong and enjoyable, with the two standouts for me being Staaf’s composition “Nymphs of the Milky Way” and their lush rendition of the Cuban classic “Los Tres Golpes.”

Here are my photos and tweets from the gig. If you’d like to get this content while it’s happening, follow me on twitter at @jasondcrane. And please visit the online homes of Carmen Staaf and Kendall Eddy.

From Carmen Staaf and Kendall Eddy at ibeam (Aug 13, 2011)

“Look out! Some serious Cuban piano happening right now with @carmenstaaf – and they’re still just warming up! #cachao”

From Carmen Staaf and Kendall Eddy at ibeam (Aug 13, 2011)

“Really clever reworking (or maybe contrafact) of a Monk tune by @carmenstaaf”

From Carmen Staaf and Kendall Eddy at ibeam (Aug 13, 2011)

“Kendall Eddy channeling Cachao”

From Carmen Staaf and Kendall Eddy at ibeam (Aug 13, 2011)

“@carmenstaaf’s ‘Nymphs of the Milky Way’ was gorgeous. She’s such a melodic writer and improviser.”

From Carmen Staaf and Kendall Eddy at ibeam (Aug 13, 2011)

From Carmen Staaf and Kendall Eddy at ibeam (Aug 13, 2011)

“Now into ‘Gone With The Wind.’ Quite a switch”
“Now onto a Kenny Wheeler tune. I think.”
“Closing out with some bop.”

From Carmen Staaf and Kendall Eddy at ibeam (Aug 13, 2011)

From Carmen Staaf and Kendall Eddy at ibeam (Aug 13, 2011)

“They had one more in them. A lovely, contrapuntal version of ‘All The Things You Are.'”

1 Comment »

August 10th 2011
Photos & Recap: David Binney at 55 Bar

Posted under Live shows & Podcast

The last time I saw saxophonist David Binney‘s band at the 55 Bar in NYC, I made the mistake of getting there at 10:30 for a 10:15 set, which meant I was so far back I was almost outside on the sidewalk. That’s because Binney packs the place every time he plays. (David was on The Jazz Session earlier this year. Listen to the interview.)

From David Binney at 55 Bar – 8/9/11

Tonight I was smarter and got there in plenty of time to get a seat right next to the band. They did not disappoint. Binney was joined by Dan Weiss on drums, Eivind Opsvik on bass and Jacob Sacks on Fender Rhodes. It was a fantastic show and I had a front row seat. Here are some of my photos and tweets from the evening. If you’d like to get this content while I’m tweeting it, just follow me on Twitter at @jasondcrane. (P.S. — Thank you to the wonderful server at 55 Bar who charged my phone and thus allowed this post to exist. I don’t know your name but you’re fantastic!)

From David Binney at 55 Bar – 8/9/11

“@davidbinney notes: DB’s band started at a level of intensity at which most bands end their shows. A whirlwind.”
“Dan Weiss is wearing a shirt that says I Hate Mayonnaise.”
“Jacob Sacks is a very impressive Rhodes player who looks like Geddy Lee.”

From David Binney at 55 Bar – 8/9/11

“Eivind Opsvik’s groove is why the word ‘deep’ exists.”

From David Binney at 55 Bar – 8/9/11

“I love David’s sound. Like a sword wrapped in silk.”

From David Binney at 55 Bar – 8/9/11

“Very intense unaccompanied saxophone solo”
“@davidbinney is driving a steamroller into a crowded mall right now.”

From David Binney at 55 Bar – 8/9/11

“rhythm section stretching out”

From David Binney at 55 Bar – 8/9/11

“Zero pretense. Everything is in service of the music.”
“Dan Weiss. Goddamn.”

No Comments »

July 22nd 2011
Photos & Recap: James Shipp’s Dirty Vibraphone Trio at Bar Next Door

Posted under Live shows

From James Shipp's Dirty Vibraphone Trio at Bar Next Door

Vibraphonist and percussionist James Shipp has been refining his trio concept for a while now, and last night’s show at Bar Next Door proved the work was worth it. Joined by Rogerio Boccato on drums and percussion and Dan Peck on tuba, Shipp played one of the most eclectic sets I’ve heard and managed to hold it all together within his broad musical vision.

James has been a guest on The Jazz Session. And, full disclosure, he’s also a member and a personal friend.

Here are some photos and tweets from last night’s show.

From James Shipp's Dirty Vibraphone Trio at Bar Next Door

“@jamesshippmusic playing beautiful tune of his, ‘Winnowing.’ Trio is vibes, tuba, drums.”

From James Shipp's Dirty Vibraphone Trio at Bar Next Door

“@jamesshippmusic now playing a slip jig (Irish jig in 9) called ‘King Of The Pub.’ On vibes. With tuba and drums. In a jazz club. Huzzah!”

From James Shipp's Dirty Vibraphone Trio at Bar Next Door

“@jamesshippmusic now playing ‘Come With Me’ based on a musical snippet from the first Willy Wonka film.”

From James Shipp's Dirty Vibraphone Trio at Bar Next Door

“Rogerio Boccato and @jamesshippmusic playing a killing pandeiro duet”
“The pandeiro duet became a fast ‘Monk’s Dream.’ Love it.”

From James Shipp's Dirty Vibraphone Trio at Bar Next Door

“Dan Peck just crushed his tuba solo on ‘Monk’s Dream.'”

From James Shipp's Dirty Vibraphone Trio at Bar Next Door

“@jamesshippmusic channeling his inner Morricone with some bowed vibes on his new tune ‘Western Violence.'”

From James Shipp's Dirty Vibraphone Trio at Bar Next Door

“@jamesshippmusic is really good at talking to the audience. Funny and engaging. Now playing a Finnish polska (not polka). Cuz why not?”
“And now a Brazilian ballad. This is certainly an eclectic set, yet it all hangs together well.”
“@jamesshippmusic on his move from Yonkers to Williamsburg: ‘Pretty much the same number of dog walkers and neck tattoos.’ #sarcasm”

From James Shipp's Dirty Vibraphone Trio at Bar Next Door

“@jamesshippmusic starting off the second set at Bar Next Door with a smart arrangment of Hello/Goodbye by Lennon & Mac.”
“This arrangment of ‘Hello/Goodbye’ is so 70s it’s thrilling. @jamesshippmusic #jazzlives #paulisntdead”

2 Comments »

July 9th 2011
Matana Roberts’ COIN COIN at The Jazz Gallery (July 9, 2011)

Posted under Live shows

From Matana Roberts – COIN COIN – The Jazz Gallery (July 9, 2011)

I’m so happy to have been at The Jazz Gallery tonight to see Matana Roberts’ COIN COIN. She’s an incredible artist and tonight’s performance hit me hard. In fact, by the time she described her great-great-grandfather toward the end, I was in tears thinking about my own grandfather. It’s powerful music that can evoke such a strong reaction. Here are a few photos and tweets from the show.

From Matana Roberts – COIN COIN – The Jazz Gallery (July 9, 2011)

“@matanaroberts playing and speaking a haunting, heart-squeezing poetry at @thejazzgallery. Get here.”

From Matana Roberts – COIN COIN – The Jazz Gallery (July 9, 2011)

“Sometimes this music is Indiana Jones, sometimes it’s the boulder. I’m not sure how Matana is keeping it together, but she is.”

From Matana Roberts – COIN COIN – The Jazz Gallery (July 9, 2011)

“from vanity and lies / from mockery and snarls / from disappointed hopes / from suns gone down at noon” -poetry from @matanaroberts

From Matana Roberts – COIN COIN – The Jazz Gallery (July 9, 2011)

“Whole room at @thejazzgallery singing ‘Because the storm is passing over … Hallelujah’ along with Matana”

From Matana Roberts – COIN COIN – The Jazz Gallery (July 9, 2011)

1 Comment »

July 9th 2011
Photos & Recap: Matuto at Sycamore (July 8, 2011)

Posted under Live shows

From Matuto at Sycamore – July 8, 2011

Matuto, the Brazilian/Americana band co-led by accordionist Rob Curto and guitarist/vocalist Clay Ross, played tonight at Sycamore on Cortelyou Road in Brooklyn, NY. They rocked hard. How hard? The show ended with the entire band and most of the crown on the sidewalk in front of the club, dancing and singing. Sadly, my phone (and thus my camera) had died by then, but here are the photos I captured earlier in the evening.

The band has been invited to travel to Copenhagen to take part in a world music trade show. They need your help to raise the funds. Please visit their Kickstarter page to learn more.

Rob Curto was on The Jazz Session earlier this year for an interview and solo accordion performance. Listen to the interview.

My friend James Shipp sat in on several tunes tonight, playing the pandeiro. Another friend who was listening with me said “he rocked my world.” No surprise, because James is amazing. Sadly, he also suffers from having played in the post-dead-battery phase of my evening.

From Matuto at Sycamore – July 8, 2011

Gil Oliveira (left) and Clay Ross lead the band upstairs before the show to woo patrons from the upstairs bar down into the basement performance space. It worked, too.

From Matuto at Sycamore – July 8, 2011

(left to right) Rob Curto, Clay Ross, Rob Hecht

From Matuto at Sycamore – July 8, 2011

(left to right) Rob Curto, Ze Mauricio, Clay Ross, Rob Hecht

From Matuto at Sycamore – July 8, 2011

From Matuto at Sycamore – July 8, 2011

No Comments »

June 28th 2011
Helen Sung’s Electric Company at 55 Bar

Posted under Live shows

I went with Canadian singer Renée Yoxon tonight to see pianist Helen Sung‘s Electric Company with guitarist Tom Guarna, bassist Dezron Douglas and drummer Rudy Royston. Here are my photos and tweets from the show.

From Helen Sung's Electric Company at 55 Bar – June 28, 2011

“Helen Sung playing Wayne Shorter’s ‘When You Dream’ at 55 Bar.”

From Helen Sung's Electric Company at 55 Bar – June 28, 2011

“Helen Sung knows how to play a Fender Rhodes.”

From Helen Sung's Electric Company at 55 Bar – June 28, 2011

“Rudy Royston is blowing up the joint with Helen Sung at 55 Bar.”

From Helen Sung's Electric Company at 55 Bar – June 28, 2011

“Helen Sung just played a lovely version of ‘Bitter’ by Meshell Ndegeocello.”

From Helen Sung's Electric Company at 55 Bar – June 28, 2011

“This version of ‘Love For Sale’ is a little too fusiony for me, though.”
“@reneeyoxon just referred to this type of fusion as ‘man jazz.’ Let’s get that trending, OK? #manjazz”

From Helen Sung's Electric Company at 55 Bar – June 28, 2011

“Rudy Royston is really stealing the show.”

No Comments »