The Jazz Session #500: Sheila Jordan

The Jazz Session celebrates its 500th episode with NEA Jazz Master Sheila Jordan. In this interview, Jordan talks about how a nickel changed her life; her early years on 52nd Street with Charlie Parker; her work with Steve Swallow and the poetry of Robert Creeley; her approach to ballads and teaching; and more.

A Special Note:

Five hundred episodes. Twelve years. The Jazz Session is, if I do say so myself, a one-of-a-kind archive of the past decade and more of this music. Hundreds of hours of stories by the people who create the music we love. I started this show in 2007 with no idea what I was doing, other than knowing I loved interviewing jazz musicians and thought other people might like it, too, if this whole podcasting thing ever caught on. When I started this show my older son was 4 and my younger son was not yet 1. Now both are over 6’ tall and one is about to start college. And through all these years, all the moves, all the life changes, The Jazz Session has kept going. Now the question becomes, how much further can it go? And the only person who can answer that question is you. I’m only able to make this show because people like you make the switch from listeners to members. I’d like to be able to do so much more with The Jazz Session: more in-person interviews, more festival coverage, more travel. That’s possible only if you decide that you value this show enough to support it. If you do, go to thejazzsession.com/join and become a member for $5 or $10 a month. You’ll get bonus episodes, early access to every show, and more. Thank you for being here all these years. Now, become a part of the next 500 episodes by becoming a member.

The Jazz Session #499: Jane Bunnett

Multi-instrumentalist Jane Bunnett and her band Maqueque have a new album called On Firm Ground/Tierra Firme (2019, Linus Entertainment). In this interview, Bunnett talks about the long and often difficult process of assembling a band of women from Cuba; the collaborative spirit that emerged from their shared struggle; the music on the new record; and more.

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I’ve been recording conversations with jazz musicians since 2007. I think it’s important work that deserves public support. I’d also like to be able to do it for my living. If you agree that The Jazz Session is worth supporting, become a member today at thejazzsession.com/join. For $5 a month you’ll get a monthly bonus episode, early access to every show, and a yearly gift. For $10 a month you get all that plus an extra bonus show exploring a classic jazz album.

The Jazz Session #498: Steve Kuhn (2009)

This week we’re stepping into the wayback machine for a 2009 interview with pianist Steve Kuhn about his album Mostly Coltrane (ECM, 2009). Kuhn worked with Coltrane for several weeks in the early 60s. In this interview, Kuhn talks about Coltrane, the Lenox School of Jazz, his composing methods, and the support he received early on from Bill Evans. He also discusses the sacrifices he made in pursuit of his musical vision.

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I’ve been recording conversations with jazz musicians since 2007. I think it’s important work that deserves public support. I’d also like to be able to do it for my living. If you agree that The Jazz Session is worth supporting, become a member today at thejazzsession.com/join. For $5 a month you’ll get a monthly bonus episode, early access to every show, and a yearly gift. For $10 a month you get all that plus an extra bonus show exploring a classic jazz album. Big thanks to Mark Redmond, the newest member of the show.

The Jazz Session #497: John Medeski

John Medeski has many irons in the fire, one of which is his new project Mad Skillet, featuring guitarist Will Bernard, sousaphonist Kirk Joseph and drummer Terence Higgins (the latter two from the Dirty Dozen Brass Band). In this interview, Medeski talks about the new album Mad Skillet; how honesty fuels his music and his sound; and the many projects he’s working on at the moment.

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I’ve been recording conversations with jazz musicians since 2007. I think it’s important work that deserves public support. I’d also like to be able to do it for my living. If you agree that The Jazz Session is worth supporting, become a member today at thejazzsession.com/join. For $5 a month you’ll get a monthly bonus episode, early access to every show, and a yearly gift. For $10 a month you get all that plus an extra bonus show exploring a classic jazz album. Big thanks to Jon Lost, the newest member of the show.